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May 21, 2010

The best Gators by jersey number, Part 10

Who is the best Florida football player to wear No. 11 in the past half-century?

No. 22? No. 55? No. 88?

During the last two weeks, we've taken a look at the past 50 years (that's as far back as school records go) to determine the elite of the elite (or most noteworthy). After closely examining the Gators' all-time numerical roster and considering both talent and significance to the program, here are my picks for Nos. 91-99 --- along with the complete list:

NO. 91: DERRICK HARVEY, DL (2004-07)
Also considered: Tremayne Allen, TE (1994-96)
Other notable: Louis Pappas (1979)
The skinny: A quick and athletic defensive end, Harvey was a key player on the Gators' 2006 national championship squad. He was twice named All-SEC by the league's coaches, then went eighth overall in the NFL Draft.

NO. 92: REGGIE MCGREW, DL (1995-98)
Also considered: Stephon Mack, DE (1988-90); Darren Mickell, DL (1990-91)
Other notable: Terron Sanders, DL (2006-PRESENT)
The skinny: A native of tiny Mayo, Fla., McGrew was expected to sign with Florida State but ended up in Gainesville, where his impact with tremendous. A dominant interior player, he was a first-team All-SEC selection in 1998.

NO. 93: ALONZO JOHNSON, LB (1983-85)
Also considered: Trace Armstrong, DL (1988); Tim Beauchamp, DL (1995-98)
Other notable: Steven Harris, DL (2002-06)
The skinny: Even though Armstrong earned several All-American honors in 1988, he only played one season at Florida. Because of that, Johnson had a much greater impact. A gifted outside linebacker, he was named a first-team All-American by The Sporting News in 1984 and '85 and was a consensus All-SEC choice each of those seasons. Johnson ended his Gator career with a school-record 27 sacks and 55 total tackles for loss. In 1985, he was one of five finalists for the Butkus Linebacker of the Year Award.

NO. 94: ED CHESTER, DL (1994-98)
Also considered: William Gaines, DL (1990-93); Jarvis Moss, DT (2003-06)
Other notable: Clint Mitchell, DL(1999-2002)
The skinny: Even though injuries shortened his career, Chester was quite possibly one of the five or six best defensive lineman in Florida history. In 1997, he was a third-team AP All-American. The next season, he was a second-team selection. Three times, Chester earned All-SEC honors.

NO. 95: RAY MCDONALD, DL (2002-06)
Also considered: Collins Cooper, PK (1997-98); Torrey Davis, DL (2007-08); James Speer, LB (1989, 1990)
Other notable: Major Parker, DL (2001)
The skinny: McDonald, whose father also was a Gator star, was productive throughout his Florida career, but particularly in 2006. While helping lead the Gators to the national title, he was an overpowering defensive tackle for arguably the country's top defense.

NO. 96: JEFF ROTH, DL (1985-88)
Also considered: William Green, DL (2008-PRESENT)
Other notable: Ernie Badeaux, DL (1995-96)
The skinny: At a time when Florida was a defensive power, Roth was a run-stuffing middle guard who also recorded 17 sacks. For his efforts, he was first-team All-SEC in his final season.

NO. 97: MICHAEL BRANDON, DL (1990-91)
Also considered: David Barnard, DL (1992-95)
Other notable: John Brown, DL (2007-08); Roland Cummings, LB (1983-85); Jimbo Pratt, LB (1980-81)
The skinny: Because this wasn't a great number, Brandon gets the nod even though he was injured often during his Gator career. When healthy, he had his moments. After college, Brandon played a handful of years in the NFL.

No. 98: GODFREY MYLES, LB (1988-90)
Also considered: Tron LaFavor, DL (2000-02); Patrick Miller, LB (1982-85)
Other notable: Anthony Riggins, DE (1992-94)
The skinny: An underrated and often forgotten member of the great team of 1990, Myles was a first-team All-SEC pick by the coaches. He played six seasons with the Cowboys.

No. 99: Sammy Green, LB (1973-75)
Also considered: Tim Paulk, LB (1988-91); Ian Scott, DL (2001-02)
Other notable:McDonald Ferguson, DL (1992-96)
The skinny: During his Gator career, Green alternated between nose guard and linebacker. In 1975, he recorded 202 total tackles, which remains a Florida record. That fall, he was a first-team AP All-American.

THE COMPLETE LIST,

NO. 1: PERCY HARVIN, WR (2007-08)
Also considered: Tony George, DB (1995-98); Jack Jackson, WR (1991-94); Reggie Nelson, S (2006)
Other notable: Dale Dorminey, QB (1981, 1983)
The skinny: This wasn't an easy pick. Jackson, a top receiver in the Steve Spurrier era, and Nelson, an unbelievable defensive back, were special talents. But Harvin might very well have been the most electrifying offensive player in Gator history. In three seasons, he helped Florida win two national titles and finished with a combined 3,781 rushing/receiving yards.

NO. 2: ADRIAN WHITE, S (1984-86)
Also considered: Jeff Demps, RB (2008-09); Will White, S (1990-92); Berj Yepremian, PK (1974-75)
Other notable: Shane Matthews, QB (1989)
The skinny: Demps is having a terrific career and White was an All-conference player, but White get the nod. A hard-hitting safety and consensus first-team All-SEC pick, he helped the Gators finish first in the SEC in 1984 and '85 for the first time in school history as part of a rock-solid defense. He went 55th overall in the 1987 draft.

No. 3: LITO SHEPPARD, CB (1999-2001)
Also considered: Travis McGriff, WR (1995-98); Larry Kennedy, CB (1991-94); Bobby Raymond, PK (1982-84)
Other notable: Brian "Thunderfoot" Clark, PK (1978-81)
The skinny: Kennedy was a solid corner/kick returner in the early 1990s who had an outstanding career despite having to play injured quite a bit. Raymond was an incredibly accurate kicker. Sheppard, though, was a first-team AP All-American in 2000 and second-team pick a year later. He arguably is one of the top two cover corners in Gator history.

No. 4: LAWRENCE WRIGHT, SS (1993-96)
Also considered: Ciatrick Fason, RB (2002-04); Marquand Manuel, DB (1997-01); Kerry Watkins DB (1987-89).
Other notable: Vernell Brown Sr., UTIL. (1982-85)
The skinny: Fason and Manuel were underrated players, but Wright is the easy choice. The heart and soul of the Gator football team in the mid-1990s, Wright was a hard-hitting safety who is best known for his monster shot on Tennessee receiver Joey Kent in 1995. In 1996, he won the Thorpe Award, which is presented to the nation's top defensive back.

No. 5: JACQUEZ GREEN, WR (1996-97)
Also considered: Andre Caldwell, WR (2003-07); Earnest Graham, RB (1998-2002); Joe Haden (2008-09)
Other notable: David Bowden, QB (1972-73)
The skinny: This number has produced a ton of talent. Haden may very well end up being the best pro of the group, but Green was the better college player. A first-team AP All-American in 1997, the speedy Green not only was a terrific receiver but an unreal kick returner. In a 1996 blowout over Kentucky, he took two punt returns to the house.

No. 6: TAYLOR JACOBS, WR (1998-02)
Also considered: Jemalle Cornelius, WR (2003-06); Judd Davis, PK (1993-94); John James, P (1970-71)
Other notable: Robert McGinty (1986-87)
The skinny: Jacobs was an NFL flop, but in college he was nothing short of sensational. In 2002, he led the Gators with 71 catches for 1,088 yards. In a win over UAB, he accumulated a school-record 246 receiving yards. Jacobs finished his career with 133 catches.

No. 7: DANNY WUERFFEL, QB (1992-96)
Also considered: John David Francis, PK (1988-89); Lorenzo Hampton, RB (1982-84); John Reaves, QB (1969-71);
Other notable: Pepe Lescano, QB (1985-87)
The skinny: Even Reaves, who ended his Gator career as the NCAA's all-time leader in passing yardage, would concede this number belongs to Wuerffel. To many Gator fans even today, he remains the most beloved Florida player of all time. During Wuerffel's four seasons, Florida won four SEC championships and a national title. He claimed the Heisman Trophy in 1996 and some think he should have won it the year before, too.

No. 8: REX GROSSMAN, QB (1999-2002)
Also considered: Carlos Dunlap, DE (2007-08); Don Gaffney, QB (1973-75); Chad Jackson, WR (2003-05).
Other notable: Ricky Easmon, DB (1982-84);
The skinny: Because he has been mediocre in the NFL, it's easy to forget how good Grossman was in college. At least before Ron Zook got ahold of him. In Steve Spurrier's final season, Grossman was the Heisman runnerup after passing for 3,896 yards and 34 touchdowns. He holds the Gator record for most 300-yard passing games.

No. 9: SHANE MATTHEWS, QB (1990-92)
Also considered: Darrell Jackson, WR (1997-99), Anthone Lott, CB (1993-96); Ray McDonald, WR (1982-85)
Other notable: Brock Berlin, QB (2000)
The skinny: When Florida became the Florida we know today, it was Matthews who led the charge. With the lanky right-hander under center, the Gators won the program's first official SEC title in 1991. He led the conference in passing three straight seasons.

No. 10: JABAR GAFFNEY, WR (2000-01)
Also considered: Jimmy Fisher, QB (1974-76); Monty Grow, LB/DB (1989-93); Tyrone Young, WR (1981-82).
Other notable: Chan Gailey, QB (1971-73)
The skinny: Grow was an athletic freak, but Gaffney very well might have been the top receiver of the Fun 'n' Gun era. In 2000, he caught 71 passes. In 2001, he had 67 receptions. During those two seasons, he recorded a combined 27 touchdown receptions. He ranks fourth on the Gator career list in that category.

NO. 11: STEVE SPURRIER, QB (1964-66)
Also considered: Riley Cooper, WR (2008-09); Jarred Fayson, WR (2006-07); Ben Hanks, LB (1992-95)
Other notable: Bobby Dodd, QB (1962)
The skinny: Quite frankly, this was the mother of easy picks. Spurrier not only won the Heisman Trophy in 1966 but led the Gators to their first national title 30 years later. Florida was good before Spurrier returned to coach, but he made the Gators great, guiding them to their first six SEC titles. Note: This number was retired for several years, which explains why it lacks a little more star power.

NO. 12: KERWIN BELL, QB (1984-87)
Also considered: Terry Dean, QB (1991-94); Doug Johnson, QB (1996-99); Chris Leak, QB (2003-06)
Other notable: John Brantley III, QB (1977-79)
The skinny: A strong case could be made for Leak, a four-year starter who led the Gators to the 2006 national title. But Bell is my choice because he quarterbacked Florida to great heights in 1984 and '85, led the Gators to the program's first No. 1 ranking, helped them finish atop the SEC standings for the first time and guided them through the rocky probation era with incredible grace. With Bell under center, the Gators ended a horrific losing streak against Georgia, went 3-1 against Florida State, beat Miami at the Orange Bowl and spearheaded arguably the most memorable comeback in Gator history -- an 18-17 win over No. 5 Auburn in which Bell scored the winning points with a QB keeper on the 2-point conversion. This is no slight whatsoever against Leak, but Bell, the former walk-on from tiny Day, Fla., has a place in the heart of every true Gator fan.

NO. 13: ALEX BROWN, DE (1998-2001)
Also considered: Ray Criswell, P (1982-85); Arden Czyewski, PK (1987-91); Larry Ochab, QB (1978-1980)
Other notable: Antwan Chiles, QB (1991-92)
The skinny: Not the strongest number, but Brown was a fine player who always seemed to play his best in big games (remember the five-sack effort against the Vols?). As a senior, he was a first-team AP All-American. Brown's first step might have been the quickest of any DE in Gator history.

NO. 14: BRUCE BENNETT, S (1963-65)
Also considered: Shayne Edge, P (1991-94); Matt Leach, K (2001-04); Ernie Mills, WR (1987-90)
Other notable: Larry Libertore, QB (1960-62)
The skinny: Bennett was one of the Gators' top players in the Silver Sixties era. A two-time All-SEC pick, he was a first-team All-American in 1965. Bennett once intercepted three passes in a single game, and had 13 picks for his career. He later was a star in the CFL.

NO. 15: TIM TEBOW, QB (2006-09)
Also considered: Reidel Anthony, WR (1994-96); Wayne Peace, QB (1981-83); Dee Webb, DB (2003-05)
Other notable: Kay Stephenson, QB (1965-66)
The skinny: Not exactly a shocker here. All Tebow did during his four storied seasons in Gainesville was win two SEC titles, two national titles and a Heisman Trophy. Tebow not only was deadly accurate as a passer, but was a punishing runner who was incredibly difficult to tackle. If he isn't the greatest player in SEC history, he's certainly in the conversation.

NO. 16: A.J. JONES, LB (2007-PRESENT)
Also considered: Vernell Brown Jr., CB (2001-05); Skipper Peek, DB (1977-79); Chris Perkins, PK (1983-84)
Other notable: Brian Schottenheimer, QB (1994-96)
The skinny: Simply put, this number hasn't been that great to the Gators. Among those who wore No. 16: QB Brian Fox, QB Chris Stephens and QB Tim Olmstead, none of whom did much in Gainesville. Brown was solid. Perkins once kicked a 60-yard field goal. Jones, though not an All-American, has been a fine player and is perhaps the most underrated member of the current Gator squad.

NO. 17: RECHE CALDWELL, WR (1998-2001)
Also considered: Noah Brindise, QB (1996-97); Jeff Dawson, PK (1985, 1986); Chas Henry (2007-PRESENT)
Other notable: Sarola Palmer, WR (1992-95)
The skinny: Another not-so-strong number in Gator history, though Henry might be the school's best-ever punter and Caldwell was a top-notch receiver. Caldwell, a QB in high school, finished his Florida career with 141 receptions. In 2001, he had 65 catches for 1,059 yards, both of which rank among the top 10 on Florida's single-season charts.

No. 18: LOUIS OLIVER, S (1985-88)
Also considered: Tony Lilly, DB (1981-83)
Other notable: Bobby Sabelhaus, QB (1995)
The skinny: Of those who wore this number, Oliver and Lilly were the only real stars. Unfortunately -- and unfairly for Lilly -- he often is remembered for a costly gaffe he made in Florida's 1983 tie at Southern California. A former walk-on, Oliver was put together physically as well as any player ever to wear a Gator uniform. He could run with the best and was a big-time intimidator in the secondary. Oliver was twice an All-American and later did quite well for himself in the NFL.

No. 19: IKE HILLIARD, WR (1994-96)
Also considered: Tony Joiner, DB (2004-07); Travis Taylor, WR (1997-99)
Other notable: Rodney Brewer, QB (1984-86)
The skinny: Hilliard never led the Gators in receiving, but anyone who saw him play knows he was special. His 29 TD receptions is tied for second best all time in Gator history, and he ranks in the top 10 in receiving yards, with 2,214. Hilliard snagged a TD pass every 4.34 receptions, which trails only one Gator -- the legendary Wes Chandler.

No. 20: ROBERT GILLESPIE, RB (1998-2001)
Also considered: Tim Groves, DB (1978-1980); Vince Kendrick, RB (1971-73); Tony Lomack, WR (1987-89)
Other notable: Brett Wiechmann, WR (1983-86)
The skinny: This was a tough call, largely because nobody really stands out. Lomack was a nice player but nothing great. Kendrick once led the team in rushing but has modest stats. A converted QB and terrific player, Groves was second-team All-SEC in 1980, but need I remind you all of what happened in the Georgia game that year? So I went with Gillespie, a tailback who could run and catch passes, making him a great fit for Steve Spurrier's offense. He rushed for 1,854 yards and had 1,091 receiving yards during a solid Gator career.

NO. 21: CRIS COLLINSWORTH, WR (1977-1980)
Also considered: Frankie Neal, WR (1983-85); Fred Taylor, RB (1994-97); Major Wright, S (2007-09)
Other notable: DeShawn Wynn, RB (2003-06)
The skinny: It takes some kind of ballplayer to top Taylor, and Collinsworth was exactly that. In fact, he's probably one of the 10 most beloved Gators of all time. Collinsworth was a two-time AP second-team All-American, a three-time first-team All-SEC pick (once while on a winless team) and an academic All-American. He also was a total stud in the NFL. Taylor was great; but the kid known as "Cadillac" is a legend.

NO. 22: EMMITT SMITH, RB (1987-89)
Also considered: Willie Jackson Jr., WR (1990-93); Terry Jackson, RB (1995-98); Steve Tannen, DB (1968-69); John L. Williams, RB (1982-85)
Other notable: Willie Jackson Sr., UTIL. (1970-72)
The skinny: The best number in Gator history? One could certainly make that argument. Willie Jackson Sr.. was one of the first two black players at Florida. One of his sons, Willie Jr., was an All-SEC receiver. The other, Terry, was a running back for a national championship team. Tannen was an All-American and first-round pick. And, of course, Williams is probably the best fullback the program has ever produced. Then there's the incomparable Mr. Smith, a gifted tailback who earned first-team AP All-America honors in 1989 as a junior before finding NFL stardom with the Dallas Cowboys.

NO. 23: ALLEN TRAMMELL, DB (1963-65)
Also considered: Derrick Gaffney, UTIL. (1976-77); Carlos Perez, WR (2000-03); Curtis Stacey, DB (1982-85)
Other notable: Leonard George, RB (1970-72)
The skinny: Special mention here goes to George, who in 1968 became the first black player to ever sign with the Gators (Willie Jackson Sr. was in the same class but signed shortly after George). But Trammell is the pick. An Auburn mascot as a child while growing up in Alabama, Trammell was a standout defensive back during the Silver Sixties and second-team All-SEC pick in 1964. He played briefly with the Houston Oilers.

NO. 24: FRED WEARY, CB (1993-97)
Also considered: Alvin Cowans, DB (1974-76); Tre Everett, WR (1989-92); Wayne Fields, DB (1973)
Other notable: Ricky Knight, DB (1983-85)
The skinny: Weary was a good one. A very good one. In 1997, he was a second-team AP All-American and one of three finalists for the Thorpe Award as the nation's top defensive back. Weary left Gainesville with 15 interceptions, tops in school history. He was first-team All-SEC twice and a key member of the 1996 national championship squad.

NO. 25: ELIJAH WILLIAMS, RB/CB (1994-97)
Also considered: Brandon James, KR/WR (2006-09); Lee McGriff, WR (1972-74); Stacy Simmons, WR (1987-89)
Other notable: Chuck Hatch (1977-79)
The skinny: This was a tough call because McGriff was such a terrific player in the early 1970s. At the end of the day, though, Williams is the right choice. From 1995-96, when Florida went 24-2, Williams was the team's leading rusher. For his career, he gained 2,181 yards, which ranks among the 10-best totals in Florida history. He also caught 842 yards worth of passes. In his final season, Williams was moved to cornerback because of need and ended up doing well there, too..

NO. 26: JARVIS WILLIAMS, S (1984-87)
Also considered: Ivory Curry, KR (1980-82); Todd Johnson, S (1999-2002)
Other notable: George Grandy, KR (1964-66)
The skinny: Williams is known for being arguably the hardest-hitting defensive back ever for the Gators. He was an AP honorable mention All-American three times and a two-time first-team All-SEC selection. Williams started every game in his four-year career and his 10 career interceptions was third on the school's all-time list when he left Gainesville.

NO. 27: NEAL ANDERSON, RB (1982-85)
Also considered: Henry Davis, CB (1974-77)
Other notable: Demetric Jackson, CB (1993-96)
The skinny: This was a total no-brainer. Only one player besides Anderson at this number was ever an All-SEC performer. That was Davis. Although Davis was a fine player, he is best known for being the defensive back who slipped and was beaten on the famed Appleby-to-Washington play against Georgia in 1975, a game the Gators lost 10-7. Anderson is truly a Gator legend. The best running back on a team loaded with players at that position in the early/mid-1980s he led the Gators in rushing three times and later became a Pro Bowler with the Chicago Bears.

No. 28: CHRIS DOERING, WR (1992-95)
Also considered: Richard Fain, CB (1987-90); Ryan Smith, CB (2006); Randy Talbot, DB (1972-74)
Other notable: Dock Pollard, CB (1996-98)
The skinny: Fain, Smith and Talbot were excellent players, but the three of them combined didn't make the impact on the program Doering did. A former walk-on who attended high school at P.K. Yonge in Gainesville, Doering is one of the most beloved players in Florida history. His miracle touchdown catch in 1993 at Kentucky is possibly the most memorable play of the 1990s. Doering finished his career with 149 receptions. In 1995, he caught 70 passes, and helped the Gators go 12-1 and play for the national championship.

No. 29: MIKE PETERSON, LB (1995-98)
Also considered: Owen Bartruff, OLB (1987-88)
Other notable: Janoris Jenkins, CB (2008)
The skinny: Not one of the stronger numbers, but Peterson certainly was a phenomenal talent. A high school quarterback from Alachua Santa Fe, he became one of the SEC's most feared linebackers. He led the team in tackles in 1998 and was a second-team AP All-American that season.

No. 30: JAMES JONES, RB (1980-82)
Also considered: Earl Carr, RB (1975-77); Earl Everett, LB (2003-06); Jim Revels, DB (1972-73)
Other notable: Bennie Alexander, CB (1997-2001)
The skinny: Everett was a solid player. For that matter, so was Revels, an All-SEC performer in the early 1970s. Carr, though talented, is best known for being the running back who got tackled on the infamous 4th-and-dumb play in the 1976 loss to Georgia. Jones is the easy choice because he really could do it all. His one-handed catch to beat Miami in the early 1980s won't soon be forgotten. Jones led the Gators in rushing three straight seasons. He was so good he went 13th overall in the 1983 draft.

NO. 31: CARLTON MILES, LB (1989-92)
Also considered: Andy Cheney, WR/KR (1969-70); James Richards, RB (1974-75)
Other notable: Octavious Gould, RB (1986)
The skinny: Not many standout players have worn No. 31. Miles, one of the Gators' most underrated and underappreciated talents of the Steve Spurrier era, is one of them. A co-captain with quarterback Shane Matthews in 1992, he finished that season with 142 tackles, which ranks among the best single-season totals in Florida history. He also led the team in tackles during the 1991 season, when the Gators won their first official SEC title. As a senior, Miles was first-team All-SEC.

NO. 32: RICKY MULBERRY, DB (1984-87
Also considered: Dustin Doe, LB (2006-09); Kedra Malone, RB/DB (1990-94); Eugene McCaslin, RB/LB (1995-99); Alan Poe, RB (1962-65)
Other notable: Reggie Nelson, S (2005)
The skinny: This was a tough call. Nelson is by far the best player at Florida to wear this number. But he only wore it one season, then switched to No. 1, which is where he had most of his success. Mulberry wasn't big, and didn't earn All-SEC or All-American honors, but he was a tough, gutsy player who was a key contributor for some incredibly rock-solid defenses.

NO. 33: ERRICT RHETT, RB (1989-93)
Also considered: Teako Brown, DB (1995-98); Tommy Durrance, RB (1969-71); Tony Green, RB (1975-77); Nat Moore, RB (1973); Larry Smith, RB (1966-68)
Other notable: Lindy Infante, HB (1960-62)
The skinny: This number is loaded, but Rhett is the obvious choice because of both his stellar play and leadership. The tough and physical Rhett led the Gators in rushing four straight seasons and finished his career with 4,163 yards, the most in Florida history. He had 20 100-yard rushing games. Rhett also had 153 receptions, which ranks fourth at UF. No Gator played or practiced harder than this guy.

NO. 34: JOHN CLIFFORD, S (1970-72)
Also considered: Daryl Dixon, DB (1999-2003); Jerome Evans, FB (1992-96); Bob Hoover, RB (1960-62)
Other notable: Brady Ackerman, RB (1991)
The skinny: A native of Coral Gables, Clifford was a standout safety in the early 1970s. In 1970, he intercepted seven passes, which would remain the school record for three decades. To this day, most remember Clifford as the Gator defender who didn't drop to the ground during the infamous "Florida Flop" at Miami in 1971. After college, he became the head football coach at Gainesville P.K. Yonge. Clifford sent several players to Florida, most notably receivers Chris Doering, Willie Jackson and Travis McGriff.

NO. 35: LARRY DUPREE, FB (1962-64)
Also considered: Ahmad Black, S (2007-PRESENT); Jimmy DuBose, RB (1973-75)
Other notable: Michael Gilmore, S (1990-94)
The skinny: Wow, what a difficult call between Jimmy Du and Larry Du. You really could flip a coin on this one. DuBose rushed for a then-school record 1,307 yards in 1975 and finished sixth in the voting for the Heisman Trophy. He also was the SEC Player of the Year and a second-team AP all-American. But Dupree, in my eyes, is the pick because as a fullback he achieved the difficult feat of being named first-team All-SEC three times. Dupree was known for being quick, explosive and durable.

NO. 36: RICHARD SKELLY, HB (1960-62)
Also considered: Kevin Freeman, RB/LB (1990-94); Vito McKeever, DB (1981-83); Anthony Williams, RB (1984-87)
Other notable: Matt McCoun, S (1998-2000)
The skinny: Because this number is particularly weak, it allowed me to go way off the grid. The guess here is that most of you haven't heard of Skelly. But in the early 1960s, he was a decent player who was picked by the New York Giants in the third round. Yet there's far more to the story. In 1961, Skelly was ruled ineligible for the entire season. The reason: his role in a prank on the school's mascot, Albert the Alligator. Back then, Albert was a live alligator the university kept in a pen on campus. Skelly and two other players, Bob Hoover and Billy Cash, were involved in the prank. Skelly reportedly was found with a hatchet in the pen and the alligator's tail was nicked. The incident was one of the most infamous and bizarre in Gator spots history. Skelly would return to the team the following season, but in October coach Ray Graves had had enough of Skelly and he was booted for disciplinary reasons. Skelly had been a prized recruit and was the star of the school's unbeaten freshman team in 1959.

NO. 37: BRUCE STARLING, B (1962)
Also considered: Hunter Bowen, P (1970); Reggie Davis, DB (1995-99); Cary Geiger, RB (1971-73).
Other notable: Teako Brown, DB (1994)
The skinny: When you start a list like this, you know there will be difficult decisions. Some of the toughest come not with strong numbers, but with weak ones. No. 37 doesn't have any stars, so it was incredibly hard to choose a player. In the end, Starling is the pick. In 1963, he went in the 19th round of the AFL draft. He lettered three years. In the 1962 Gator Bowl win over Penn State, he made a one-handed interception.

No. 38: HARVIN CLARK, DB (1969-71)
Also considered: Wayne McCall, LB (1965-67); Willie McGrady, FB (1987-88); Jonathan Phillips, PK (2005-09)
Other notable: Chuck Wabbersen, RB (1989-90)
The skinny: Clark was a member of the famed Super Sophs of 1969 and was a Gator co-captain in 1971. In the '71 season-ending rout at Miami (the "Florida Flop" game), Clark returned a punt 82 yards for a touchdown late in the final quarter. The problem was, Florida had wanted the ball, not points, so quarterback John Reaves could break Jim Plunkett's career passing record. Miami tried to run out the clock in an attempt to keep Reaves from breaking the record. But with the Hurricanes deep in Gator territory, Clark called for the flop, a play forever known as "38 fall" because of Clark's number. On the play, most Gator defenders hit the ground, allowing Miami to score. Florida got the ball back and Reaves got his record. Clark has been hated by longtime Miami fans ever since.

No. 39: NAT MOORE, RB (1972)
Also considered: Chris Bilkie, FB (1990-94); Larry Brinson, RB (1974-76); Cedric Smith, FB (1986-89)
Other notable: Teddy Sims, LB (1996-99)
The skinny: Moore wore No. 33 as a senior but was No. 39 a year earlier -- and that was his better season. That fall, Moore was an honorable mention AP All-American and first-team All-SEC pick after leading the Gators in rushing. He also was Florida's top receiver in '72. Moore would later become a standout with the Miami Dolphins.

No. 40: BRANDON SILER, LB (2004-06)
Also considered: Johnnie Church, DE (1992-95); Brandon Hicks, LB (2007-PRESENT); Mike Rich, RB (1969-71)
Other notable: Gerold Dickins, LB (1983-87)
The skinny: Siler is one of the more underrated Gator players of the past decade. He not only was a key member of the 2006 national championship team but was a third-team AP All-American.

NO. 41: RYAN STAMPER, LB (2006-09)
Also considered: Steve Heidt, LB (1964-66); Keith Kelsey, LB (1995-99); Ed Robinson, LB (1989-93)
Other notable: Mike Peterson, LB (1994)
The skinny: Heidt was an outstanding player on some excellent defenses. He even had a pick in the infamous win over Florida State in the 1966 Lane Fenner game. But this was a two-man battle between Robinson and Stamper. Robinson was a fine player in the early 1990s and a team captain, but Stamper gets the nod because of his contributions to the special seasons of 2008 and '09. Stamper appeared in 41 games with 26 starts and was a team captain as both a junior and senior. He had 148 total tackles (77 solo) and made 13.5 tackles for loss. As a senior, Stamper earned second-team All-SEC honors.

NO. 42: JEVON KEARSE, LB(1995-98)
Also considered: John Feiber, HB (1964-66); Darren Hambrick, LB (1993-94); Billy Latsko, FB (2003-06); James Massey, RB (1983-87)
Other notable: Johnny Gaffney, WR (1978-1981)
The skinny: After the great Wilber Marshall, Kearse might be the most feared Gator defender of all time. Simply put, he couldn't be blocked. Kearse actually signed with Florida as a defensive back, but before long "the freak" found a permanent home as a pass rush specialist. As a senior, Kearse was a second-team AP All-American. That same season, he was one of three finalists for the Butkus Award and one of three finalists for the Bednarik National Defensive Player of the Year award. A year later, Kearse was named NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year.

NO. 43: GLENN CAMERON, LB (1972-74)
Also considered: John Faix, DB (1968-71); Matt Farrior, LB (1999-2003); Warren Gaffney, DB (1976, 78);
Other notable: Graham McKeel, FB (1964-67)
The skinny: One of the Gators' top defenders in the 1970s, Cameron was a third-team All-American as a senior and first-team All-SEC selection. That season, he had an amazing 185 total tackles. Cameron went 14th overall in the 1975 NFL draft and had a nice career as a pro.

NO. 44: JAMES BATES, LB (1992-96)
Also considered:: Marcus Thomas, DT (2003-06); Richard Trapp, WR (1965-67); Willie Wilder, RB (1976-77)
Other notable: Fee Bartley, LB (1988-91)
The skinny: This was one of the most difficult choices to make. Although Bates was the pick, a very strong argument could be made for Trapp, who was Steve Spurrier's top target in 1966, the year he won the Heisman. Trapp was a sensational player and two-time first-team All-SEC performer. He once had 12 catches in a game and twice led the Gators in receiving. He also played in the NFL. That said, Bates also was All-SEC and was the top tackler for the 1996 national championship team.

NO. 45: CARLOS ALVAREZ, WR (1969-71)
Also considered: Andra Davis, LB (1997-2001); Pat Moorer, LB (1986-89); Leon Pennington, LB (1982-85)
Other notable: Don Knapp, RB (1965-66)
The skinny: One of the all-time great Gators, words can't do justice to the kind of player Alvarez was. He left Florida with a school record 172 catches, 88 of which came during his legendary sophomore season. Nicknamed "the Cuban Comet," Alvarez could only be stopped by one thing -- injuries. Also an honor student and activist during the Vietnam War, Alvarez won an NCAA Post-Graduate scholarship and became a lawyer.

NO. 46: WEBBIE BURNETT, NG (1986-87)
Also considered: Jimmy Barr, DB (1969-71); Jarvis Herring, DB (2001-05)
Other notable: Jim Revels, DB (1971)
The skinny: Right about now, many of you are probably asking this: Who the heck is Webbie Burnett? Well, Burnett wasn't a great player, but he had one great moment and that was enough to move him to the top at No. 46, which isn't very loaded. In Florida's miracle 18-17 win against unbeaten and fifth-ranked Auburn in 1986, it was Burnett who recovered a key fourth-quarter Auburn fumble. A few minutes later, the Gators had scored a TD, gotten the 2-point conversion and wrapped up the most amazing game many in these parts have ever seen.

NO. 47: BRUCE VAUGHAN, DB (1980-83)
Also considered: Brandon Antwine, DT (2006-09); Todd McCullough, LB (2001-05); Matt Pearson, LB (1991-95)
Other notable: Rod Graddy, DB (1996-98)
The skinny: A solid defensive back for some excellent Gator defenses, Vaughan had 10 career interceptions, which ranks among the top totals in Florida history. He also made the SEC Academic honor roll.

No. 48: DEXTER DANIELS, LB (1992-95)
Also considered: Wayne Barfield, PK (1965-67)
Other notable: Todd Gatlin, LB (1985-88)
The skinny: A highly touted recruit from Georgia, Daniels ultimately became a two-time second-team ALL-SEC linebacker, playing on three SEC championship squads.

No. 49: JERMAINE CUNNINGHAM, DE (2006-09)
Also considered: Jeff Chandler, PK (1998-2001); Fernando Jackson, LB (1979-82)
Other notable: Hank Rone, P (1989)
The skinny: Jackson was an All-SEC inside linebacker and Chandler was an exceptional kicker, but Cunningham is the pick. A second-round draft choice, Cunningham made 38 career starts and recorded 152 tackles, 34 tackles for loss and 19.5 sacks. He was a 2009 AP second-team All-SEC selection. He left Gainesville with two national titles.

No. 50: BRAD CULPEPPER, DT (1988-91)
Also considered: Phil Bromley, C (1982-84); Ricky Browne, LB (1971-73)
Other notable: Yancey Sutton, DE (1977-1980)
The skinny: In a perfect world, it would have been nice to give Sutton, among the most inspirational Gators of all time (he was deaf) the nod. But in reality, it came down to Bromley and Culpepper. Bromley arguably is the best center the Gators have ever had. But Culpepper, who also was student body president, was a dominant tackle and 1991 AP first-team All-American.

NO. 51: BRANDON SPIKES, LB (2006-09)
Also considered: Bill Carr, C (1964-66); Ryan Kalich, OL (1995-99); David Little, LB (1978-1980); Robbie Moore, OL (1973-76)
Other notable: Anthony Ingrassia, OL (1992-94)
The skinny: This has been a great number for the Gators. Ultimately, it became a choice between Little and Spikes. Little was All-SEC three times and an AP first-team All-American in 1980. But Spikes was a two-time AP All-American and member of two national championship teams. He made 39 starts and collected 307 total tackles, 31.5 for loss.

NO. 52: CHRIS BROMLEY, OL (1986-90)
Also considered: Roger Pettee, LB (1963-64); David Swain, C (1992-94); Dwayne Thomas, LB (1995-97)
Other notable: Phil Pharr, LS (1978-1980)
The skinny: A solid guard for both Galen Hall and Steve Spurrier teams, Bromley was a second-team All-SEC choice in 1990 when the Gators finished first in the conference.

NO. 53: CHARLIE WILLIAMS, LB (1975-77)
Also considered: Bruce Culpepper, OL (1960-62); Kim Helton, C (1967-69)
Other notable: Frank McCarthy, C (1982-86)
The skinny: A captain in 1977, Williams made 409 career tackles, fourth on Florida's all-time list. He had 153 stops as a senior, when he was second-team All-SEC.

NO. 54: MARK MURRAY, DE (1986-90)
Also considered: David Jorgensen (1998-2002); Willie Rodgers, DE (1993-97); Lex Smith, DL (1991-92)
Other notable: James Harrell, LB (1978)
The skinny: A defensive end on a powerful 1990 squad, Murray was a second-team All-SEC pick. Only 6-foot-2, 233 pounds, he was the perfect complement to fellow end Huey Richardson, a first-team All-American. In 1989, Murray led all Gator linemen in sacks.

NO. 55: SCOT BRANTLEY, LB (1977-79)
Also considered: Willie Cohens, DE (1995-98); Channing Crowder, LB (2003-04); Ralph Ortega, LB (1972-74); Mike Pouncey, OL (2007-PRESENT)
Other notable: Travis Carroll, LB (2000-01)
The skinny: Crowder, Ortega or Pouncey would have been solid choices, but Brantley is the pick. Playing hurt much of his career, he was a two-time first-team All-SEC pick and is No. 2 on the Gators' all-time chart for tackles. Only two Gators ever had their numbers retired -- Steve Spurrier and Brantley (the numbers were later unretired by Spurrier). Brantley is a true Florida legend.

NO. 56: MAURKICE POUNCEY, OL (2007-09)
Also considered:Clifford Charlton, LB (1985-87); Tim Newton, DT (1983-84); Tony Rowell, OL (1990-91)
Other notable: Harvey Thomas, DE (1992)
The skinny: A first-round draft choice this spring, Pouncey is one of the top linemen in school history. He started 39 games and won the 2009 Rimington Trophy, which is awarded to the nation's best center. Pouncey was a first-team All-SEC pick in his final season.

NO. 57: KEVIN CARTER, DE (1991-94)
Also considered: Tim Golden, DE (1978-1980); Bobby McCray, DE (1999-2003); Jeremy Mincey, DE (2004-05)
Other notable: Scott Armstrong, LB (1984-86); Jerry Odom, LB (1987-90)
The skinny: One of the most chiseled athletes in Gator history, Carter was proof nice guys could finish first. As a senior, he was first-team All-SEC, a finalist for the Lombardi Award and a second-team AP All-American. Carter was taken sixth overall in the 1995 draft and had a lengthy and productive NFL career.

No. 58: JOHNNY RUTLEDGE, LB (1995-98)
Also considered: Ron Moten, LB (1982-86); Kenny Parker, DL (2001-04)
Other notable: Mike Kerr, DE (1989-90)
The skinny: In 1998, Rutledge was first-team All-SEC and one of 10 semifinalists for the Butkus Award. A year earlier, he was second-team All-SEC. Rutledge led the Gators in tackles in 1997.

No. 59: CAL DIXON, C (1988-91)
Also considered: Jimmy Morgan, LB (1962-63); Mike Nattiel, LB (1999-2002); Wyley Ritch, C (1994-97)
Other notable: Mark Korff, LB (1983-84)
The skinny: During a stellar 1991 season, Dixon was named as a second-team AP All-American. He was twice a first-team All-SEC selection.

No. 60: BILLY HINSON, OL (1982-84)
Also considered: Jim Benson, OL (1964-66); Jack Katz, OL (1962-63); Mark White, OL (1988-91)
Other notable: Henry McMillian, DL (1992-94)
The skinny: Benson was All-SEC. So was Katz. Ditto for White. Hinson? Well, no. But he was a starting lineman in 1984 when the Gators had an offensive line so good it was known as the Great Wall of Florida. Hinson started at left guard. The left tackle at that time was all-everything Lomas Brown.

NO. 61: ELLIS JOHNSON, DT (1991-94)
Also considered: Gerald Loper, OL (1973-75); Gerard Warren, DT (1997-2000)
Other notable: Mo Mitchell, OL/DL (2001-04)
The skinny: Although Warren was a stud (he went third overall in the 2001 draft), Johnson is the pick. In 1994, he was first-team All-SEC and the CNN National Defensive Player of the Year. The following spring, Johnson was taken in the first round of the NFL Draft.

NO. 62: MAC STEEN, OL (1967-69)
Also considered: Dean Golden, OL (1990-94); Alonzo Mitz, DL (1982-85); Corey Yarbrough, OL (1995-99)
Other notable: Red Anderson, MG (1964-66)
The skinny: A standout offensive guard for the famed 1969 team, Steen was first-team All-SEC and an AP honorable mention All-American. Today, he's an orthodontist in DeLand.

NO. 63: MIKE WILLIAMS, OL (1973-75)
Also considered: Don Swafford, OL (1976, 78); Jim Tartt, OL (2004-08)
Other notable: Tracy Daniels, C (1984-88)
The skinny: A stud offensive tackle when Florida had one of the country's most dangerous rushing attacks, Williams was first-team All-SEC and an AP honorable mention All-American in 1975.

NO. 64: BURTON LAWLESS, OL (1972-74)
Also considered:: Keith Tribble, OL (1975-76)
Other notable: Greg Cleveland, OL (1983-85)
The skinny: Lawless is regarded as one of the program's best-ever offensive linemen. A pulling guard, he was second-team All-SEC in both 1973 and 1974, then went 44th overall in the 1975 NFL Draft (Dallas). He was the only rookie to start in the Super Bowl the following season.

NO. 65: JIMMY RAY STEPHENS, DE/C/LB/TE (1973)
Also considered: Arpedge Rolle, DT (1999-2002)
Other notable: Dan Plonk, OL (1979-82)
The skinny: Among a weak crop, this was an easy choice. In 1973, Stephens was second-team All-SEC at center. He was again second-team All-SEC three seasons later at tight end. In the 1990s, Stephens joined Florida's staff as an offensive line assistant.

NO. 66: SCOTT HUTCHINSON, DE (1975-77)
Also considered: Larry Beckman, OL (1963-65); Robin Fisher, DL (1979-81); David Hitchcock, NG (1971-73)
Other notable: Keith Council, DT (1993-96)
The skinny: Hutchinson was an excellent player on a few solid Gator squads. As a team captain in 1977, he was first-team All-SEC. He later played a handful of seasons in the NFL.

NO. 67: KEITH WILLIAMS, DT (1986)
Also considered: Mark Campbell, DT (1992-95); Darrell Carpenter, DT (1974-76); Drew Miller, OL (2004-07); Larry Travis, G (1960-62)
Other notable: Gerald Odom, OL (1963)
The skinny: A sometimes dominant defensive tackle in the mid-1980s, Williams was an honorable mention AP All-American in 1985 and '86. In 1985, he was second-team All-SEC. The following season, he was a first-team selection.

No. 68: MIKE DEGORY, C (2001-05)
Also considered: Fred Abbott, LB (1971-72); John Hunt, OL (1981-83); Bill Richbourg, G (1962-64); Rhondy Weston, DL (1985-88)
Other notable: Elijah Brown, OL (1993-95)
The skinny: Some absolute studs have worn this number for the Gators. Abbott and Weston also would have been solid choices. Degory was picked, however, because he was a three-time All-SEC selection and was a first-team choice in 2005.

No. 69: ZACH PILLER, OL (1996-98)
Also considered: Dan Fike, OL (1979-82)
Other notable: Dennis Forrester, DL (1975-76)
The skinny: Fike and Piller both became excellent NFL players. Fike was a starter for the great Cleveland Brown teams of the 1980s. Piller, though, was better in a Gator uniform and was a first-team All-SEC pick by the coaches in 1998.

No. 70: COOPER CARLISLE, OL (1995-99)
Also considered: Scott Trimble, OL (1982-84); Ronnie Wilson, OL (2005-06, 2008)
Other notable: Scott Joslyn, OL (1991)
The skinny: One of the best offensive linemen in the Steve Spurrier era, Carlisle was a first-team All-SEC coaches pick in 1999. He just completed his 10th NFL season.

NO. 71: MIKE PEARSON, OL (1998-2001)
Also considered: Tony McCoy, DT (1987-91); Jeff Mitchell, C (1992-96)
Other notable: Michael DuPree, DE/LB (1976-78)
The skinny: Mitchell was a third-team AP All-American during Florida's 1996 national championship season, but Pearson had the better overall career. The standout left tackle was a first-team AP All-American in 2001 and a two-time first-team All-SEC choice.

NO. 72: LARY GAGNER, OL (1964-65)
Also considered: Lance Butler, OL (2002-05); John Durden, OL (1985-89); Dock Luckie, DL (1977-1980)
Other notable: Greg Gingelski, OL (1990-93)
The skinny: A standout offensive lineman, Gagner was first-team All-SEC in both 1964 and '65. As a senior, he was a Football News first-team All-American. Gagner later had a solid career in the NFL. Today, he's an artist living in Tampa.

NO. 73: DAVID WILLIAMS, OL (1984-88)
Also considered: Carlton Medder, OL (2003-07); Anton Peters, T (1960-62); Jim Watson, OL (1990-93)
Other notable: Xavier Nixon, OL (2009-PRESENT)
The skinny: Williams generally is regarded as being one of the school's finest offensive linemen. He was a two-time AP honorable mention All-American and a first-team AP All-SEC pick in 1988 before having a very successful NFL career.

NO. 74: JACK YOUNGBLOOD, DL (1968-70)
Also considered: Jason Odom, OL (1992-95); Jeff Zimmerman, OL (1983-86)
Other notable: Randy Hand, OL (2002-05)
The skinny: Even though Youngblood is in the Gator Ring of Honor and is an NFL Hall of Famer, this was a tougher choice than one might think. Odom was All-SEC three times (first team twice), twice named the SEC's top blocker, a finalist for the Outland Trophy and a first-team AP All-American in his final season. But Youngblood is the pick -- barely. He was named to the SEC's All-Decade team for the 1970s, is in the College Football Hall of Fame and was an All-American in 1970.

NO. 75: LOMAS BROWN, OL (1981-84)
Also considered: Shannon Snell, OL (2000-03); Phil Trautwein, OL (2004-08); Donnie Young, OL (1992-96)
Other notable: Richard Starowesky, OL (1985-89)
The skinny: Brown generally is recognized as the Gators' top all-time offensive lineman. A consensus first-team All-American on Florida's famed 1984 squad, Brown also was a two-time All-SEC pick. A first-round draft choice, he played in multiple Pro Bowls.

NO. 76: PAUL PARKER, OL (1972-74)
Also considered: Dennis Murphy, T (1962-64)
Other notable: Marcus Gilbert, OL (2007-PRESENT)
The skinny: A standout offensive tackle, Parker was twice a second-team All-SEC selection while helping pave the way for a strong ground game.

NO. 77: GUY DENNIS, OL (1967-68)
Also considered: Cheston Blackshear, OL (1995-99); Crawford Ker, OL (1983-84); Hersham Ismail, OL (1988-91); Frank Lasky, T (1962-63); Max Starks, OL (2000-03); Jason Watkins, OL (2005-08)
Other notable: Mark Totten, C (1975-77)
The skinny: This number is packed with talent. Dennis is the pick because in 1968 he was a UPI and Walter Camp first-team All-American. A native of rural Walnut Hill, he also was first-team ALL-SEC twice in his storied Gator career.

No. 78: KENYATTA WALKER, OL (1997-2000)
Also considered: Jonathan Colon, OL (2001-04); Reggie Green (1992-95)
Other notable: Tommy Duhart, DT (1984-85)
The skinny: Walker was a fantastic tackle who earned second-team AP All-America honors in his final Gator season. He also was a two-time All-SEC pick (once as a first-teamer) before heading off to the NFL as the 14th overall pick.

No. 79: MO COLLINS, OL (1995-97)
Also considered: David Forrester, OL (1975-77); Steve Rissler, OL (2003-06)
Other notable: Josh Taotoai, OL (1989)
The skinny: The 23rd overall pick in the 1998 NFL Draft, Collins was a key player for three great squads in 1995, '96 and '97. Although he never earned All-American or All-SEC honors (Rissler was first-team All-SEC in '06), Collins was held in relatively high regard.

No. 80: CHRIS FAULKNER, TE (1979-82)
Also considered: Barry Brown, E (1963-65); Sam Holland, E (1960-62); Mark McGriff, TE (1986-88);
Other notable: Shawn Nunn, TE (1992-96)
The skinny: One of the top tight ends in Gator history, Faulkner was both an honorable mention All-American and first-team All-SEC selection during his Florida career. He still shares the Gator record for most catches in a game by a tight end (nine).

NO. 81: AARON HERNANDEZ, TE (2007-09)
Also considered: Dallas Baker, WR (2002-06); Randy Clark, DB (1982-83)
Other notable: Monty Duncan, WR (1990-92)
The skinny: Arguably the top tight end in Gator history, Hernandez was a pass-catching machine during his college career. He won the 2009 John Mackey Award as the country's best tight end after leading all tight ends nationally in receptions (68) and receiving yards (850). Hernandez was an AP first-team All-American.

NO. 82: AUBREY HILL, WR (1991-94)
Also considered: David Ghesquiere, LB (1967-69); Mike Mularkey, TE (1980-82); Aaron Walker, TE (1999-2002)
Other notable: Walter Odom, TE (1983-87)
The skinny: Unlike Ghesquiere and Walker, Hill was never an All-SEC player, but he nonetheless was an immensely valuable Gator during the early 1990s. Blessed with terrific hands, Hill was most noted for being coach Steve Spurrier's go-to receiver on third down. Of his 86 career catches, 18 went for touchdowns -- the third-best ratio in Gator history.

NO. 83: DWAYNE DIXON, WR (1981-83)
Also considered: Russ Brown, E (1962-63); David Nelson, WR (2006-09); Harvey Thomas, DE (1988-91)
Other notable: Jason Dean, WR (1995-96)
The skinny: A standout receiver in the early 1980s, Dixon was an AP honorable mention All-American and first-team All-SEC selection in 1983. He finished his Gator career with more than 1,500 receiving yards.

NO. 84: LYNN MATTHEWS, DE (1963-65)
Also considered: Harrison Houston, WR (1990-93); Ben Troupe, TE (2000-03)
Other notable: Tate Casey, TE (2004-08)
The skinny: A legendary Gator, Matthews earned All-American honors in 1965 and was a two-time All-SEC pick. He was a three-year starter known for making big plays.

NO. 85: DAVID GALLOWAY, DL (1978-1981)
Also considered: Mike Brandon, DL (1989); George Rushing, TE (1990-92)
Other notable: Steve Shipp, WR (1997)
The skinny: A one-man wrecking crew (when healthy) inside who would later star in the NFL, Galloway had 21 career sacks as a Gator. A third-team AP All-American in 1981, Galloway also was a two-time All-SEC performer.

NO. 86: GARY ROLLE, WR (1982-84)
Also considered: Charlie Dean, TE (1991-93); Alonzo Sullivan, WR (1988-91)
Other notable: Darrell Lee, DE (2000-03)
The skinny: Rolle is among the most honored Gators ever -- off the field. An incredible student and academic All-American, he is one of only five Gator players awarded with the National Football Foundation Scholar-Athlete Award. On the field, he was a late-round draft pick of the Denver Broncos.

NO. 87: JIM YANCEY, TE (1968, 70-71)
Also considered: Mike Clark, DE (1978-1980); Robby Stevenson, P (1995-98)
Other notable: Chris Braun, TE (1993-94)
The skinny: Yancey was an AP honorable mention All-American in 1970. That same season, he was first-team All-SEC. He once had an 81-yard TD reception against Florida State.

No. 88: WILBER MARSHALL, LB (1981-83)
Also considered: Randy Jackson, T (1963-65); Erron Kinney, TE (1998-99); Kirk Kirkpatrick, TE (1986-90): Jim Yarbrough, TE (1966-68)
Other notable: Jeremy Kennedy, TE (1991-93)
The skinny: Quite likely, Marshall was the most feared Gator defender of all time. Recruited to Gainesville as a tight end, he would become an elite pass rusher and two-time first-team AP All-American. Marshall was named ABCTV Defensive Player of the Year in 1983 and was a finalist for the Lombardi Award his last two seasons. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2008.

No. 89: WES CHANDLER, WR (1975-77)
Also considered: Charles Casey, WR (1963-65); Spencer Jackson, WR (1979-82); Ricky Nattiel, WR (1983-86)
Other notable: Billy Cash, K (1962)
The skinny: Chandler might have been the SEC's most dangerous offensive player in the 1970s. Even though he played in a Wishbone offense, he was a two-time first-team All-American. Chandler caught 92 passes in his career for 1,963 yards and 22 touchdowns. He averaged a school-record 21.3 yards per reception.

NO. 90: HUEY RICHARDSON, LB (1986-90)
Also considered: Preston Kendrick, LB (1972-74); Lawrence Marsh, DT (2007-09); Mike Moten, DL (1993-97)
Other notable:
The skinny: A dominant outside linebacker, Richardson was an All-American three times and garnered first-team AP honors in 1990. He finished his Florida career with 26.5 sacks and 50.5 total tackles for loss.

NO. 91: DERRICK HARVEY, DL (2004-07)
Also considered: Tremayne Allen, TE (1994-96)
Other notable: Louis Pappas (1979)
The skinny: A quick and athletic defensive end, Harvey was a key player on the Gators' 2006 national championship squad. He was twice named All-SEC by the league's coaches, then went eighth overall in the NFL Draft.

NO. 92: REGGIE MCGREW, DL (1995-98)
Also considered: Stephon Mack, DE (1988-90); Darren Mickell, DL (1990-91)
Other notable: Terron Sanders, DL (2006-PRESENT)
The skinny: A native of tiny Mayo, Fla., McGrew was expected to sign with Florida State but ended up in Gainesville, where his impact with tremendous. A dominant interior player, he was a first-team All-SEC selection in 1998.

NO. 93: ALONZO JOHNSON, LB (1983-85)
Also considered: Trace Armstrong, DL (1988); Tim Beauchamp, DL (1995-98)
Other notable: Steven Harris, DL (2002-06)
The skinny: Even though Armstrong earned several All-American honors in 1988, he only played one season at Florida. Because of that, Johnson had a much greater impact. A gifted outside linebacker, he was named a first-team All-American by The Sporting News in 1984 and '85 and was a consensus All-SEC choice each of those seasons. Johnson ended his Gator career with a school-record 27 sacks and 55 total tackles for loss. In 1985, he was one of five finalists for the Butkus Linebacker of the Year Award.

NO. 94: ED CHESTER, DL (1994-98)
Also considered: William Gaines, DL (1990-93); Jarvis Moss, DT (2003-06)
Other notable: Clint Mitchell, DL(1999-2002)
The skinny: Even though injuries shortened his career, Chester was quite possibly one of the five or six best defensive lineman in Florida history. In 1997, he was a third-team AP All-American. The next season, he was a second-team selection. Three times, Chester earned All-SEC honors.

NO. 95: RAY MCDONALD, DL (2002-06)
Also considered: Collins Cooper, PK (1997-98); Torrey Davis, DL (2007-08); James Speer, LB (1989, 1990)
Other notable: Major Parker, DL (2001)
The skinny: McDonald, whose father also was a Gator star, was productive throughout his Florida career, but particularly in 2006. While helping lead the Gators to the national title, he was an overpowering defensive tackle for arguably the country's top defense.

NO. 96: JEFF ROTH, DL (1985-88)
Also considered: William Green, DL (2008-PRESENT)
Other notable: Ernie Badeaux, DL (1995-96)
The skinny: At a time when Florida was a defensive power, Roth was a run-stuffing middle guard who also recorded 17 sacks. For his efforts, he was first-team All-SEC in his final season.

NO. 97: MICHAEL BRANDON, DL (1990-91)
Also considered: David Barnard, DL (1992-95)
Other notable: John Brown, DL (2007-08); Roland Cummings, LB (1983-85); Jimbo Pratt, LB (1980-81)
The skinny: Because this wasn't a great number, Brandon gets the nod even though he was injured often during his Gator career. When healthy, he had his moments. After college, Brandon played a handful of years in the NFL.

No. 98: GODFREY MYLES, LB (1988-90)
Also considered: Tron LaFavor, DL (2000-02); Patrick Miller, LB (1982-85)
Other notable: Anthony Riggins, DE (1992-94)
The skinny: An underrated and often forgotten member of the great team of 1990, Myles was a first-team All-SEC pick by the coaches. He played six seasons with the Cowboys.

No. 99: Sammy Green, LB (1973-75)
Also considered: Tim Paulk, LB (1988-91); Ian Scott, DL (2001-02)
Other notable:McDonald Ferguson, DL (1992-96)
The skinny: During his Gator career, Green alternated between nose guard and linebacker. In 1975, he recorded 202 total tackles, which remains a Florida record. That fall, he was a first-team AP All-American.


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